Chapters :
  • LIBERAL INTELLECTUAL PRINCIPLES – 11
  • Differences Between an Ordinary Bill and a Money Bill
  • COMMITTEE SYSTEM
  • STANDING COMMITTEES

LIBERAL INTELLECTUAL PRINCIPLES – 11

Differences Between an Ordinary Bill and a Money Bill
S. No Ordinary Bill Money Bill
1 It can be introduced either in the LokSabha or in the RajyaSabha. It can be introduced only in the LokSabha.
2 President’s prior recommendation is not required for its introduction. President’s prior recommendation is required for its introduction in the LokSabha.
3 The President can exercise his suspensive veto power on it. The President cannot exercise his suspensive veto power on it.
4 The RajyaSabha can vote on it. The RajyaSabha cannot vote on it. It can only suggest changes which can be either accepted or rejected by the LokSabha.
5 It can be either amended or rejected by the RajyaSabha. It can neither be amended nor be rejected by the RajyaSabha.
6 In case of a deadlock, the President can summon a joint sitting of two houses for resolving the issue. The RajyaSabha has to return the bill with or without recommendations to the LokSabha within 14 days. If it does not return the bill, it is deemed to be passed by both the houses.
7 The Speaker does not certify the bill as an ordinary bill. The Speaker certifies the bill as a money bill.
8 It can be introduced either by a minister or by a private member. It can be introduced only by a minister.
COMMITTEE SYSTEM The parliamentary committees are constituted for aiding the Parliament in carrying out its enormous functions effectively. The committees provide a platform for accessing the much needed technical and professional support from the field experts. A parliamentary committee is one that satisfies the following conditions
  1. It works under the direction of the Speaker of LS or the Chairman of RS.
  2. It submits its reports either to the house or to the Speaker or the Chairman.
  3. It gets secretariat assistance from the LS or the RS.
The Parliamentary committees are broadly classified into two types. They are
  1. Standing Committees
  2. Ad Hoc Committees
STANDING COMMITTEES: These are permanent and regular committees constituted every year to carry out the wide range of businesses of the Parliament. Based on the nature of functions, these committees are classified into six categories. They are
S.No Committee Functions
1 Financial Committees
a Public Accounts Committee The committee examines the audit reports of Comptroller and Auditor General of India(CAG). It gets assistance from the CAG. The Chairman is appointed by the Speaker from the opposition party. A minister cannot be a member of this committee. Members are drawn from both the LokSabha and the RajyaSabha.
b Estimates Committee The committee examines the budget estimates and suggests ways to improve the management of resources and alternative policies to the government. A minister cannot be its member. The Chairman is appointed by the Speaker from the ruling party. The members are drawn only from the LokSabha.
c Committee on Public Undertakings The committee examines the audit reports of CAG on the Public Undertakings. The Chairman is appointed by the Speaker from amongst the members of LS. A minister cannot be its member. The members are drawn from both the LS and the RS.
2 Departmental Standing Committees There are 24 departmental standing committees that cover all the ministries and respective departments of the Union government. A minister cannot become its member. Their primary functions include examining the demands for grants, annual reports and bills of respective departments.
3 Committees to Inquire
a Committee on Petitions It examines the petitions on bills and other matters of public importance. The LS and the RS have separate committees for the purpose.
b Committee on Privileges It examines the matters of breach of privileges by the members of the houses. The LS and the RS have separate committees for the purpose.
c Ethics Committee It maintains the decorum and decency within the houses by enforcing the code of conduct on the members. The LS and the RS have separate committees for the purpose.
4 Committees to Scrutinise and Control
a Committee on Papers Laid on the Table It examines all the papers laid on the table of the houses by the ministers to check for their complicity with the provisions of the constitution, acts and rules. The LS and the RS have separate committees for the purpose.
b Committee on Subordinate Legislation It examines whether the legislative powers delegated by the parliament to the executive are exercised properly. Separate committees are constituted in both the houses.
c Committee on Welfare of SCs and STs It examines the reports of the National Commission for SCs and the National commission for STs. It also examines the matters related to the welfare of SCs and STs.
d Committee on Empowerment of Women It examines the reports of the National Commission for Women and other matters related to the empowerment of women.
e Committee on Government Assurances It examines the assurances given by the ministers in the houses and check for their implementation. Separate committees are constituted in both the houses.
f Joint Committee on Offices of Profit It examines whether the persons elected as Members of Parliament hold any office of Profit.
 
error: Content is protected !!
Scroll to Top